Five ways to use video

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This is James, the Head of Teacher Training here at Rennert, giving 5 quick ideas on how to incorporate video into your lessons.

Transcript:

James: Hi! So, today I would like to share with you five ways of using video in the classroom:

1. One, for reading. If you have a video that has a sequence of events, beforehand you need to do the preparation, but write down the events on strips of paper. Students then read them and do an ordering activity, so that’s the reading part, and then they can watch the video to check their answers.

2. Another thing is a writing activity. For example, students could watch a video clip, identify the main events or incidents and then write a summary. So, you could use that to practice sequencing, cohesion or summarizing skills.

3. Another option is teaching grammar or practicing grammar. For example, if you’re doing connectors like and/but/therefore, you can get a video that has a chain reaction. Often, like, comedies will have a sequence of, like, catastrophic but funny, events. And then, you prepare two clauses like the beginning event and the second event and card with a connector. Give students the different clauses and different connectors and then after watching it they have to mingle around and find their match and make a sentence—a logical sentence using the connectors and then you could have them watch again to double check.

4. The fourth one would be teaching vocabulary. For example, you could write sentences about a video clip that contains vocabulary errors. Students watch the video and then they have to correct the errors based on the clip.

5. And finally a speaking activity you could do. You could divide the students into pairs. One watches the video and one has their back to the video. And then as they are watching, or after, a partner describes what is happening. And then the person who didn’t watch it has to work together then, as a class, to re-create the story.

So, five different ways you can use video—reading, writing, grammar, vocabulary, and speaking.

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